Cruises

Ocean Cruise

Ocean Cruises

With more than 70 percent of the world covered in water, it’s hardly a surprise that the cruise industry is the fastest-growing travel sector: according to Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) a record 23 million passengers are expected to set sail this year, to nearly 1,000 ports around the world. Even firmly avowed “noncruisers” are donning their proverbial water wings and boarding cruise liners to venture across the seven seas.

Polar Cruises

Polar Cruises

Antiartica and Artic

Antarctica is a continent surrounded by ocean, while the Arctic is an ocean almost completely surrounded by land.

Arctic ice is typically thicker than Antarctica ice (6 – 10 ft and in some places 12-15 ft). However, with water under it, some of the water’s heat escapes through the ice. Even in winter, some of the ice breaks up and releases ocean heat to warm the air. The Arctic receives relatively warm water from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Most of Antarctica is covered by a few thousand feet of ice – though there is some geothermal heat beneath the ice, that heat can’t escape. The Southern Ocean surrounds Antarctica, and winds from its strong storms help create an ocean current that circles the continent. This reduces the amount of warm water that reaches the land. The result? The Antarctic region is colder than the Arctic.

River Cruise

River Cruises

River cruise is a voyage along inland waterways, often stopping at multiple ports along the way. Since cities and towns often grew up around rivers, river cruise ships frequently dock in the center of cities and towns.

According to Douglas Ward, “A river cruise represents life in the slow lane, sailing along at a gentle pace, soaking up the scenery, with plentiful opportunities to explore riverside towns and cities en route. It is a supremely calming experience, an antidote to the pressures of life in a fast-paced world, in surroundings that are comfortable without being fussy or pretentious, with good food and enjoyable company.”

Best Airfare Search Engines

Kiwi Search

Kiwi.com (formerly Skypicker) allows travelers to find and book the cheapest flights possible. With an extensive database of low-cost flights and traditional airlines, interactive map, and guaranteed arrival, the user experience skyrockets to another level.

JetRadar Search

Jetradar is one of the largest online search engines for flights all over the world helping thousands of people to compare airline prices, track down carriers’ special offers, and book the cheapest tickets available. The fastest travel search engine on the web helps users to find flights to all destinations from all major airlines.

CheapAir.com

CheapAir and its team of 90 travel enthusiasts use cutting edge technology, a boatload of airfare data, and superior customer service to make it easier and less stressful to buy affordable airline tickets. We’ve built a proprietary airfare shopping engine that scours the web for the lowest prices on the planet and shows you all the options in a simple, easy to navigate display. 

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